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The 10 Cheapest Places to Live in Nova Scotia in 2024

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Nova Scotia, one of Canada’s four Atlantic provinces, is on the eastern coast. In addition to its mainland area, Nova Scotia has about 3,800 coastal islands and is renowned for its slower pace of life and proximity to all kinds of natural beauty.

Although it’s relatively cheap to live anywhere in Nova Scotia, there are 10 places in the province that stand out when it comes to affordability. Those include New Glasgow, Amherst, and Sydney. 

This guide covers the ten cheapest places to live within Nova Scotia, including their cost of living, population and best highlights.

Top 10 Cheapest Places in Nova Scotia Compared

This table outlines the top ten cheapest places in Nova Scotia to give you a bird’s eye view of what the province has to offer:

CityPopulationCost of Living (with rent) 
New Glasgow18,665$1,348 
Amherst 9,500$1,349
Sydney30,000$1,473
Bridgewater8,700$1,491
Yarmouth 6,800$907
Windsor5,500$1,311.1 (without rent) 
Truro 23,000$1,359
Lower Sackville 27,000$1,485
Lunenburg 48,599$1,520
Trenton 2,400 $1,366

Cheap Places to Live in Nova Scotia

Known for its safety, lush nature, and family friendliness, Nova Scotia is an excellent place to live if you want to reside in one of Canada’s easternmost provinces.

It also has a low cost of living relative to the rest of Canada. In a survey on worldwide cost of living figures, Canada was ranked the 25th most expensive country.

But the cost of living in Nova Scotia is only about half of Canada’s average cost of living. In other words, you can get a lot of bang for your buck in this sparsely populated province.

Whether you choose to make a home in New Glasgow, Bridgewater, Truro, or Trenton, you will surely find an affordable, enjoyable life in the province.

1. New Glasgow

A small town in Pictou County, New Glasgow, is home to just over 18,665 people. It was settled and named by Scottish pioneers in the late 18th century, and it’s considered the gateway to Nova Scotia’s northern coast.

A one-bedroom apartment in the city center typically costs you just $730 a month. Overall monthly cost of living in New Glasgow is just $1,348.

2. Amherst

Sized similarly to New Glasgow, Amherst has about 9,550 residents. It’s a small city on the border of New Brunswick, and both the Glooscap and Sunrise trails begin there. The town offers excellent schools, churches and healthcare facilities.

With a monthly cost of living clocking in at just $1,349, living in Amherst is 11% cheaper than Canada’s average.

3. Sydney

Located on the east coast of Nova Scotia’s Cape Breton Island, Sydney is a former city that has since been dissolved into a regional municipality. Once a steel and industrial production hub, Sydney has shrunk in size since steel companies left the area.

It’s home to about 30,000 people. Monthly cost of living there is about $1,473 for a single person who rents.

4. Bridgewater

Bridgewater is located at the navigable limit of the LeHave River, meaning it has a robust waterfront community. It’s been called the “Main Street of the South Shore.”

Home to about 8790 residents, Bridgewater has a slightly higher cost of living at about $1,491 per month. A one-bedroom apartment in the town’s center will run you about $897 per month.

5. Yarmouth

Located in southwestern Nova Scotia, Yarmouth’s main industries are fishing and tourism. It is one terminal of a ferry service that goes to Bar Harbor, Maine.

While the town’s maritime golden age may have passed, it retains the traditional Victorian style of that area, making it a beautiful place to live. The monthly cost of living is about $907.

Related: Best things to do in Nova Scotia and fun places to visit.

6. Windsor

Situated on Highway 101, Windsor is a service center for the western part of Hants County. It’s a small town that is home to about 5514 people, and it has a rich indigenous history involving the Mi’kmaq tribe.

But above all else, it’s known as the “birthplace of hockey” in Canada. With a cost of living of $1,311 per month (without rent), living in Windsor is 13% cheaper than living in Canada on average.

7. Truro

Home to just over 23,000 people, Truro is a town situated in central Nova Scotia. It’s known as the “hub of Nova Scotia” due to its convenient location and its attractive, historic downtown.

It follows that Truro is a thriving business location with plenty of jobs available. Living in Truro will cost you an average of $1,359 a month for a single person who rents.

8. Lower Sackville

One of Halifax’s suburbs, Lower Sackville, is a close-knit community that’s home to about 27,000 people. With a thriving business district, it’s home to many well-known Canadian chains and independent retailers and restaurants.

Living in Lower Sackville will cost you about $1,485 per month for a single person that rents.

9. Lunenburg

One of only two urban communities in North America that are designated as a UNESCO World Heritage site, Lunenburg is a beautiful, historic community. It’s a port town with roots in rum running and ship building, and it’s full of brightly painted colonial buildings constructed in the 1750s.

With a small population of just 48,599 residents, Lunenburg is a must-visit destination for any trip to Nova Scotia. Living there will cost you about $1,520 per month.

10. Trenton

A small town on the East River in Pictou County, Trenton is home to just 2,474 people. It offers a low crime rate and low housing costs, and it has been lauded as one of the best places to live in Canada. For a single person who rents, living there will cost an average of just $1,366 per month.

How to Choose the Cheapest Place to Live in Nova Scotia

Choosing the cheapest place to live in Nova Scotia really depends on your priorities. Are you looking for a more fast-paced town that’s closer to an urban area?

If so, Lower Sackville might be right for you as it’s part of the greater Halifax region. If you’re looking for a beautiful waterfront community with historical roots, you might consider Lunenburg.

Overall, you’ll need to analyze the size, crime rate, weather, population, and cost of living of each town that you consider making a home in. At the end of the day, the best place in Nova Scotia to live depends on what you’re looking for.

Ranking Methodology

To discover the cheapest places to live in Nova Scotia, we scoured data and statistics regarding population, crime rates, cost of living, weather, and more. We aimed to gain detailed information about each city’s quality of life and general living experience. Check out our references if you’d like to dive into more info.

References

FAQs

Where is the best place to live in Nova Scotia?

The best place to live in Nova Scotia depends on your personal preferences and the lifestyle that you’re looking for. Nova Scotia’s capital, Halifax, is the province’s main city. If you’re searching for a smaller town, you might want to consider Windsor or Trenton.

What is low income in Nova Scotia?

Low income in Nova Scotia includes anyone with a household income of less than $43,000 annually. Those individuals are available for Canada’s Affordable Access Program.

What city in Canada has the lowest cost of living?

Sherbrooke, a city in Quebec, has the lowest cost of living in any city in Canada. Its cost of living is about 16% lower than the national average.

Is Nova Scotia cheap to live in?

Nova Scotia is cheap to live in compared with other Canadian provinces like Ontario or British Columbia. It is ranked as the 4th cheapest province and offers an attractive cost of living.

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Enoch Omololu, MSc (Econ)

Enoch Omololu, personal finance expert, author, and founder of Savvy New Canadians, has written about money matters for over 10 years. Enoch has an MSc (Econ) degree in Finance and Investment Management from the University of Aberdeen Business School and has completed the Canadian Securities Course. His expertise has been highlighted in major publications like Forbes, Globe and Mail, Business Insider, CBC News, Toronto Star, Financial Post, CTV News, TD Direct Investing, Canadian Securities Exchange, and many others. Enoch is passionate about helping others win with their finances and recently created a practical investing course for beginners. You can read his full author bio.

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