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15 Best Places to Retire in Canada in 2024

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When it comes to the best place in Canada to retire, there are a few things to consider. First, consider your budget and what matters most to you. 

If you’re looking for the warmest places in Canada to retire, you’ll want to consider BC. Whatever your preferences are, there’s a perfect place for you to call home. 

You’ve worked hard your whole life, and now it’s time for you to enjoy the Golden Years. You don’t have to stay in the current spot you’re living in. Canada is a huge country with benefits in every province, and you can relocate based on your wants and needs. 

To help you with your search, we have created an extensive list of the best places to retire in Canada

They’ve been chosen for their good weather, comfort, variety of amenities, accessibility to doctors, healthcare, and affordable housing. 

We have kept in mind that community counts and highlighted the cheapest places to retire in Canada if you’re on a budget. 

The Places to Retire in Canada 

1. Victoria, BC

Stunning floral display at Butchart Gardens
Stunning floral display at Butchart Gardens
  • Population: 397,237 (metro area)
  • Cost of Living: A single person’s estimated monthly costs – $1,615 (without rent)
  • Weather: Average temperature – Summer 20°C/Winter 10°C
  • Lifestyle: Dense population, above-average costs, safe, and friendly.
  • Average housing costs: $1.25 million
  • Property taxes: 0.44%

Victoria, BC, is located on Vancouver Island, and the downtown core is right on the water. It ticks many boxes in terms of being one of the best places to live in Canada.

This city has a high doctor per capita rate with low property taxes if you can afford the initial purchase of a house. It is mild and one of the driest cities on the west coast. It is also one of the warmest places to retire in Canada.

Victoria is the capital of BC and is known as the Garden City, so it’s not ideal if you have allergic reactions to pollen. It’s a great spot for extroverted people as there’s a vibrant community with a dense population. 

2. Vancouver, BC

vancouver
Beautiful view of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
  • Population: 2.9 million
  • Cost of Living: $1,594.6 per person, not including housing costs
  • Weather: Average Max Temp – Summer: 22°C/Winter: 8°C
  • Lifestyle: Expensive, healthy, bustling
  • Average housing costs: $1,251,000
  • Property taxes: 0.28%

Vancouver has a lot to offer in terms of doctor care and lifestyle. It is considered the best place in Canada to retire if you have saved a lot of money for your retirement years.

It’s one of the most “unaffordable cities in the world” and one of the most liveable. 

Although it’s quite large, Vancouver is very safe, and BC itself has the best medical system next to Switzerland and Sweden. Whatever kind of medical assistance you need, it’s available in Vancouver. 

The weather is mild all year, and property taxes are low if you can afford to buy here. Vancouver boasts Pacific Ocean shorelines and pristine beaches in many parts of the city.

There are also plenty of big-city attractions with as many opportunities to find peace in nearby nature. 

Vancouver is also one of the best places to live in Canada.

3. Halifax, NS

Harbor and downtown at night, in Halifax
Night view of the harbour and downtown buildings in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • Population: 480,582
  • Cost of Living: $1,481.90 per person, not including housing costs
  • Weather: Average temperature – Summer 23°C/Winter 0°C
  • Lifestyle: Big city, affordable lifestyle, friendly people
  • Average housing costs: $511,600
  • Property taxes: 1.11%

Halifax is a vibrant, upbeat city and is at the top of our list for the best place to retire in Nova Scotia. It is definitely one of the best places to retire in Atlantic Canada.

As it’s ultimately the hub of the East Coast, this is where the doctors and healthcare facilities are. 

You’ll have access to coastal Atlantic shores and fresh seafood daily. As it’s on the seaside, you’ll get a nice breeze during warm summer days. 

The winters don’t get too cold compared to other East Coast cities. The city itself is historic, so just going for a walk is enjoyable. Most activities you’ll experience will be centred around the seas. 

Buying a home here is reasonable, while property taxes are average at 1.03%. You can take advantage of free healthcare with no premiums with Medavie Blue Cross, which operates under the province.

4. Kelowna, BC

Okanagan wine country in Western Canada, British Columbia. Landscape with vineyards and lake
Okanagan wine country in Western Canada, British Columbia. Landscape with vineyards and lake
  • Population: 144,576
  • Cost of Living: $1,388.60 per person, not including housing costs
  • Weather: Average Max Temp – Summer: 27°C/Winter: 0°C
  • Lifestyle: Welcome to retirees, touristy, laid-back
  • Average housing costs: $1,020,297
  • Property taxes: 0.40%

Kelowna is a fantastic place for retirees, but you’ll pay for the luxuries available. The percentage of retirees here is above the national average. Living in the Okanagan has many perks, like four seasons, dry weather, lakeside communities, and a wine country. 

Housing is costly, and it can be hard to find a place to buy or rent. However, there are various levels of living accommodations catering to the retirement community. You can choose assisted living, long-term care homes, and independent retirement living. 

There are ample medical facilities, including a hospital with over 700 beds and a decent amount of doctors per capita.

5. Ottawa, ON

Ottawa Parliament Hill building
Parliament Hill building in Ottawa, Canada
  • Population: 1.1 million
  • Cost of Living: $1,599 per person, not including housing costs
  • Weather: Average Max Temp – Summer: 27°C/Winter: -11°C
  • Lifestyle: Family-oriented, historic, peaceful
  • Average housing costs: $632,487
  • Property taxes: 1.17%

Ottawa is the nation’s capital city, with historical buildings scattered throughout the city. It’s not one of the warmest places to retire in Canada, so if you’re hoping for mild winters, Ottawa probably isn’t for you. 

It’s got all the big city amenities, and because it’s the capital city, there’s a lot of pride in all the upkeep.

The city is quiet and clean, with a high quality of life, while the cost and property taxes are low compared to BC retirement places. Some of the best healthcare facilities are in Ottawa, so you’ll have excellent medical care here. 

Ottawa is one of the best places to live in Ontario.

6. Fredericton, NB

New Brunswick Legislative Building
The New Brunswick Legislative Building in Fredericton, New Brunswick. The Second Empire-style building opened in 1882.
  • Population: 63,116
  • Cost of Living: $1,261.30 per person, not including housing costs
  • Weather: Average Max Temp – Summer: 25.5°C/Winter: -15°C
  • Lifestyle: Small-town quaintness with amenities of a big city
  • Average housing costs: $281,559
  • Property taxes: 1.90%

Fredericton is a small city that offers great amenities. It is the capital city of New Brunswick, a province that aims to take good care of the senior community.

It’s not crowded but still has a lot of facilities to make your life comfortable here. Property prices are extremely low, which should help offset higher property taxes. 

If you’re looking to rent, it’s very reasonable here. If you enjoy culture, there are a lot of historical attractions here as well as parks.

Fredericton is also a great place for nature lovers who want big-city amenities. New Brunswick’s basic medical insurance is government-funded and includes most medically required services. 

7. Quebec City, QC

Quebec City skyline
Quebec City skyline over a river with blue sky and clouds.
  • Population: 557,390
  • Cost of Living: $1,474.4 per person, not including housing costs
  • Weather: Average Max Temp – Summer: 25°C/Winter: -4°C
  • Lifestyle: European charm, heritage, quaint
  • Average housing costs: $467,645
  • Property taxes: 1.02%

Quebec City is unique in Canada as it’s mainly French-speaking and has a very European feel to it.

While it’s quite small, there is a great deal of culture here, including a stunning walled city and a unique heritage square overlooking St. Lawrence Square. 

Housing prices are very reasonable, and so are property taxes, making it one of the cheapest places to retire in Canada on our list. The economy is robust here, and it’s a safe place to retire with a very upbeat urban center. 

Generally, the province of Quebec has excellent health services and social services are run by the same department.

Quebec also has the most doctors per capita in Canada, so you can find a family doctor easily.

8. Kingston, ON

The Kingston City Hall in Kingston, Ontario, Canada
The Kingston City Hall was completed in 1844
  • Population: 132,485
  • Cost of Living: $1,529 per person, not including housing costs
  • Weather: Average Max Temp – Summer: 25°C/Winter: -3°C
  • Lifestyle: Moderate pace of life, healthy
  • Average housing costs: $564,404
  • Property taxes: 1.44%

While Kingston has a large community of young people due to the large university here, it’s still a great place to retire. It’s a large enough city that you’re getting some great amenities with good shopping, but it’s still quite laid back. 

There’s a lot of history too, with old historical buildings and large trees filling green spaces throughout the city. They have a great transportation system and excellent medical facilities. Kingston General Hospital is the largest in the area. 

There are many outdoor places to be in nature and museums to peruse. Other activities include sailing, golfing, and fishing.

9. Saint John, NB

st john new brunswick
Saint John has a big tourism sector, having over 1.5 million visitors and 200,000 cruise ship visitors a year to shops, hotels, and landmarks
  • Population: 69,895
  • Cost of Living: $1,479 per person, not including housing costs
  • Weather: Average Max Temp – Summer: 23°C/Winter: -1°C
  • Lifestyle: Friendly, vibrant, laid-back
  • Average housing costs: $302,834
  • Property taxes: 2.27%

Right now, Saint John in New Brunswick offers one of the lowest real estate prices in Canada. It’s also known to be full of the happiest people in Canada. Saint John is right on the Bay of Fundy in Atlantic Canada. 

It’s got great energy and an urban feel to it. With such affordability, you can do all the activities you dreamt of doing when you retire. This is an excellent retirement spot for those who love fishing or boating. 

Note that there are fewer doctors here, and in recent years, there have been waiting lists to secure a family doctor. However, there are excellent medical facilities for a small city. 

The average home price is $302,834, and if you’re looking to rent, a 1-bedroom is around $1,200. Regarding the cheapest places to retire in Canada, look no further than Saint John.

Related: Minimum Wage in New Brunswick.

10. Calgary, AB

Peace Bridge in Calgary
Peace Bridge across Bow River in Calgary on a sunny day, Canada
  • Population: 1.4 million
  • Cost of Living: $1,567.30 per person, not including housing costs
  • Weather: Average Max Temp – Summer: 21°C/Winter: -2°C
  • Lifestyle: Fast-paced, friendly, business
  • Average housing costs: $554,500
  • Property taxes: 0.66%

Calgary is one of the most populated cities in Canada, but it’s still affordable. The taxes are lower as well, thanks to the oil industry. Not only is the cost of living low but so are the property taxes. 

The downside of the weather is that it can get extremely cold during the winter.

Calgary is a friendly city that’s safe and upbeat. It is one of the best places to retire in western Canada when it comes to affordability.

It is also one of the best cities to live in Alberta.

11. London, ON

london ontario
An aerial of London, Ontario, Canada on a clear day
  • Population: 422,324
  • Cost of Living: $1,500 per person, not including housing costs
  • Weather: Average Max Temp – Summer: 20°C/Winter: -6°C
  • Lifestyle: Laid back, casual urban 
  • Average housing costs: $629,605
  • Property taxes: 1.46%

London has a great location, close to Niagara Falls and Toronto. It’s affordable and is a fairly big city on its own. Despite all that, it has a lot of green space with the nickname “Forest City.” This is a great spot for nature lovers. 

London boasts plenty of medical facilities and practitioners with experts in specific fields. There are heavy snowfalls here during winter, and during the summer, it’s hot and humid.

12. Canmore, AB

canmore alberta
The Rocky Mountains near Canmore, Alberta, Canada
  • Population: 14,370
  • Cost of Living: $1,500 per person, not including housing costs
  • Weather: Average Max Temp – Summer: 23°C/Winter: -4°C
  • Lifestyle: Small-town friendliness, nature, easy living
  • Average housing costs: $925,582
  • Property taxes: 0.44%

Canmore is a stunning town tucked into the Canadian Rockies and a great spot for nature lovers. If you’re looking for the cheapest places to retire in Canada, Canmore will not fit the bill, with average housing prices close to a million dollars. 

It’s an exclusive area with a vibrant community for seniors. There is the Canmore Seniors Association, a highlight of the town. Through annual membership, you can take part in indoor and outdoor activities and social events. 

If you like to ski or get in on outdoor sports, there is downhill skiing, cross-country skiing, outdoor rinks, and much more.

In the summer, it’s a great spot for golfers, hikers, tennis players, and cyclists. There are plenty of doctors for the number of people living in Canmore.

13. Burlington, ON

burlington ontario
An aerial view of the Burlington Pier, Ontario, Canada
  • Population: 196,914
  • Cost of Living: $1,550.80 per person, not including housing costs
  • Weather: Average Max Temp – Summer: 27°C/Winter: 2°C
  • Lifestyle: Nature, laid-back, social
  • Average housing costs: $1,003,873
  • Property taxes: 0.86%

Burlington is a leisurely small city with 115 parks, so it’s an excellent spot for nature lovers. There’s easy access to Toronto, so while you can access plenty of amenities and medical services in Burlington, there’s much more in the nearby metropolis. 

There’s a strong community here with a love for the arts. There is a hospital in town, and nearby is the town of Hamilton that takes care of emergencies. 

Burlington comes with a high cost of living compared to other small cities in Ontario. There are co-op opportunities and a variety of retirement living opportunities. 

14. Charlottetown, PEI

charlottetown canada
Small fishing boats in a calm blue harbour on Prince Edward Island in Canada
  • Population: 40,500
  • Cost of Living: $1,324 per person, not including housing costs
  • Weather: Average Max Temp – Summer: 23°C/Winter: -3°C
  • Lifestyle: Friendly, scenic, quaint
  • Average housing costs: $361,800
  • Property taxes: 1.67%

Prince Edward Island is a place of dreams and one of the best places to retire in Atlantic Canada. The cost of living is low, and the scenery is mindblowing if you can handle the rainy days. 

The crime rate is low here, and they have made it appealing for retirees with low property taxes and affordable housing. There are a variety of retirement homes and housing options for seniors. 

People are incredibly friendly here as well, so if you’re social, this is a great place to be. The PEI government also has many Senior Programs to make life easier if you come to live here. 

Related: Best things to see and do in PEI.

15. Winnipeg, MB

Winnipeg Manitoba
Winnipeg panorama at sunset. Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
  • Population: 749,607
  • Cost of Living: $1,388.80 per person, not including housing costs
  • Weather: Average Max Temp – Summer: 26°C/Winter: -11°C
  • Lifestyle: Big city feeling, friendly, artsy
  • Average housing costs: $376,618
  • Property taxes: 2.64%

If you can handle the chilly winters, Winnipeg offers a lot for retirees. The summers are hot and humid, while the winters are long and cold. It’s very affordable, however, even with higher than normal property taxes. 

If you’re looking for the cheapest places to retire in Canada, this is definitely one of them. You can still enjoy big-city amenities with plenty of medical facilities.

There are more than 87 walk-in clinics. Winnipeg is also a foodie hub without the premium costs, so if you enjoy going out for meals, you’ll love Winnipeg.

Related: Best places to live in Manitoba.

How To Choose a Retirement Location in Canada 

You’re going to have your preferences when it comes to the best place to retire in Canada.

This could be anything from the temperature to the number of hiking trails near you. You may have already created an intensive checklist to help you find your retirement location. 

Your personal preferences are just the beginning. You’re also going to need to stay within your budget. For example, living in Vancouver, BC, may be highly desirable, but can you afford it on your budget? 

Here are the top considerations regarding finding the best place in Canada to retire.

Cost Of Living 

If you’ve saved a good amount of money for retirement, you still want to be cautious about where you decide to live. 

An expensive area of Canada can quickly deplete your savings, and you won’t have extra money for things like vacations. The cost of living includes things like:

  • Renting/owning expenses
  • Food prices
  • Transportation costs
  • Cost of medical care (each province has their coverage and costs)
  • Cost of hobbies and interests
  • Costs of community activities and attractions

We sourced the average cost of living expenses information from Numbeo.

Housing Prices

Some of the best places to live in Canada are also the most expensive. Big cities like Vancouver and Toronto have the highest housing costs in the country, which could put a big dent in your retirement savings. 

When you buy a home, it’s considered an asset, and how well it will appreciate is also a consideration. Rent prices will be reflected in how much housing is in the area. 

Weather  

If you have chronic conditions like arthritis or fibromyalgia, you’ll want to consider a place that is warmer and more humid. There are some very cold areas in Canada, but on the west coast, winters are milder. 

The west coast doesn’t see much snow either, whereas Eastern Canada will often see many weeks of cold weather and snow.

In the summer, there are hot spots that can be equally as uncomfortable. Places like Winnipeg and Kelowna can get unbearably hot in the summer. 

Lifestyle

Do you want to live in a bustling city with many amenities or have a quiet, slower pace of living? As you figure out the best place to retire in Canada, you’ll want to consider your desired lifestyle. 

If you want to enjoy a simple life and focus on hobbies, a smaller place might be for you. If you have an outgoing personality and want to meet other people, you may want to consider living in the city. 

There are positives and negatives to each side, so you really want to consider your needs and wants. 

Population

The warmest place to retire in Canada will likely be a larger city. Living in a bigger city gives you anonymity, whereas when you live in a small town, you’ll probably get to know your neighbours. 

A more populated city means you’ll have access to facilities, activities, businesses, amenities, and community offerings. Alternatively, you may want to be part of a quieter, close-knit community where people are more friendly.

Property Taxes

It’s important to consider how much property taxes you’ll pay in the desired locations. When looking at the best place to retire in Nova Scotia, you can bet it will cost less in property taxes than in a big city like Toronto. 

During your retirement years, property tax rates can take a large chunk out of your savings. 

Accessibility to a Doctor

If you’re relocating and need to find another doctor, it’s important that you can get one. Even in smaller towns, there may be a waitlist to get your own doctor. 

If you can’t find one, you’ll be thrown back and forth, having to explain your medical conditions to different doctors you see. Retirees need access to medical facilities and accessible doctors. 

The concentration of doctors and how many people live in your desired area is something to consider so you can get medical care when you need it without any hassle. 

Quality of Life

If you’ve always dreamt of living by the sea and are looking for the best place to retire in Canada on a budget, the East Coast is a great spot. If you want to experience culture and a wide range of restaurants, a city like Vancouver or Toronto could be right for you. 

The quality of life you want depends on your interests. Create a dream list of what you want to experience from retirement. It could be malls and shopping or easy access to nature. Quality of life also includes the amount of crime in the area and how safe it is.

Conclusion

These Canadian cities all offer a lot for those of you who are ready to retire.

The top best places to retire in Canada have excellent lifestyles with plenty of doctors, but they’re very expensive. Atlantic Canada is generally less costly but has fewer social offerings and is often pretty cold in the winter. 

When choosing the best place to retire in Western Canada or Atlantic Canada, know your budget and what you want. This makes it easy to determine where you’d like to live. 

Related:

Author

Gravatar for Enoch Omololu, MSc (Econ)
Enoch Omololu, MSc (Econ)

Enoch Omololu, personal finance expert, author, and founder of Savvy New Canadians, has written about money matters for over 10 years. Enoch has an MSc (Econ) degree in Finance and Investment Management from the University of Aberdeen Business School and has completed the Canadian Securities Course. His expertise has been highlighted in major publications like Forbes, Globe and Mail, Business Insider, CBC News, Toronto Star, Financial Post, CTV News, TD Direct Investing, Canadian Securities Exchange, and many others. Enoch is passionate about helping others win with their finances and recently created a practical investing course for beginners. You can read his full author bio.

About Savvy New Canadians

Savvy New Canadians is one of Canada's top personal finance platforms. Millions of Canadians use our site each year to learn how to save for retirement, invest smartly, maximize rewards, and earn extra cash. We have been featured in prominent finance media, including Forbes, Globe and Mail, Business Insider, CBC, MSN, Wealthsimple, and TD Direct Investing. Learn more about Savvy New Canadians.

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10 thoughts on “15 Best Places to Retire in Canada in 2024”

  1. Gravatar for Jeremy

    This is a good, informative article. The pictures for each city make the places look inviting.

    There are a couple of typos that need to be corrected:
    – Remove multiple copy/paste instances of “Quebec:” for the “doctors” info for Kingston, Calgary, and Charlottetown.
    – The average housing cost in Winnipeg is $374,000, not $34,000.

    • Gravatar for Enoch Omololu

      @Jeremy: Good catch on the typos. The content has been updated. Cheers!

  2. Gravatar for Dave Butler

    Enjoyed the article. A great snapshot of the places given. I’m wondering though if you’ve ever done an article on the best places to retire worldwide (for Canadians). I’d love to see that. Thanks for your great work!

    • Gravatar for Enoch Omololu

      @Dave: Thanks for your feedback. I will add the “best places to retire worldwide” to my to-do list. Cheers!

  3. Gravatar for kev

    Enoch – I really enjoy your articles. They’re well written, and both informative and easy to follow, which is quite a feat considering the complexity of the subject matter. If you every write a book on personal finance, I’d buy it.

    Quick question on Kelowna – you make note of the expensive housing costs in the writeup, but the metric states a very low average housing cost of 413K. Is this missing a zero? 😉

    cheers

    • Gravatar for Enoch Omololu

      @Kev: You are right, that’s the avg price for condos. I also updated some others with numbers for January.

  4. Gravatar for Kalos

    Are these USA dollars, or Canadian dollars?
    I’d like to see a discussion of relative costs between retirement in the USA and Canada for dual USA/Canadian citizens.

    • Gravatar for Enoch Omololu, MSc (Econ)

      @Kalos: These are in Canadian dollars.

  5. Gravatar for Tammy

    You can easily find a family doctor in Quebec?? Jokes. No you can’t. As a matter of fact, you can’t anywhere.

    • Gravatar for Enoch Omololu, MSc (Econ)

      @Tammy: How about compared to other places in Canada?

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